Andreas Road

Andreas Road


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John Andreas and his wife Margaret

Courtesy of Palm Springs Historical Society.  All Rights Reserved

STREET NAMES: ANDREAS ROAD, ANDREAS HILLS DRIVE, ANDREAS PALMS DRIVE

ATTRIBUTION: JOHN JOSEPH ANDREAS

LIVED: 09/17/1874 – 10/05/1959

FORMER NAME (OF ANDREAS ROAD): Lawn Street

Several roads and places in the Palm Springs area are named for John Joseph Andreas.  John Joseph belonged to the panik clan that occupied the Andreas Canyon area.  He was born to Juan Andreas and Elena Ria in Crafton, California.  At this time, the Crafton Ranch and its orchards were a popular source of employment for Cahuilla laborers during harvesting seasons.  As a result, John Joseph became a skilled farmer and orchardist.

John Joseph’s father Juan Andreas had been a leader of the panik clan and an early advocate of maintaining control over traditional territories. His influence caused Rincon Village at Andreas Canyon to be a focus of political activity.  In 1891, he submitted a signed announcement stating that those wishing to enter Andreas Canyon would require the clan’s consent.  He was considered a principal lieutenant of Cabezon — a regional leader of the Cahuilla who fought for Indian sovereignty.

John Joseph married Margaret Augustine in 1910.  Though he developed familial ties to the Augustine Reservation and the Morongo Reservation through marriage, John Joseph was raised in Andreas Canyon  and considered it to be his ancestral home.  Desirous of returning to Andreas Canyon’s Rincon Village, John Joseph and his son Anthony Joseph would request and be granted enrollment at Agua Caliente.

John Joseph served as gatekeeper at the entrance to the Indian Canyons in the late 1930s, collecting tolls to supplement tribal income obtained from the tribal bathhouse at the hot spring.  These early business enterprises formed a cornerstone for Palm Springs tourism.

The 1930s also brought with them deep divisions within the tribe.  John Joseph supported a faction of tribal members that sought change in tribal government, shifting away from the traditional, clan-based leadership model to a more inclusive form of rule.

About Andreas Canyon

Andreas Canyon is home to an oasis of indigenous Washingtonia filifera palms and more than 150 other species of plants.  A foot trail leads through the canyon, passing groves of skirted palms, unusual rock formations (some containing petroglyphs and pictographs), Andreas Creek, and bedrock mortars once used for preparing food.