Cahuilla Road

Cahuilla Road


View Larger

1876 Executive Order by President Grant formally established the Agua Caliente Indian Reservation

STREET NAMES: CAHUILLA ROAD, CAHUILLA HILLS ROAD

ATTRIBUTION: the native people inhabiting the San Gorgonio Pass area, the Coachella Valley, and the San Jacinto/Santa Rosa Mountians

FORMER STREET NAME (OF CAHUILLA ROAD): Orange Street

About the Cahuilla People

The Cahuilla Indians are the aboriginal people of this region.  They traditionally occupied a diverse territory of desert, canyons, passes, and mountains with elevations ranging from 273 feet below sea level at the Salton Sink to 11,000 feet at Mt. Jacinto.  Together these traditional territories spanned an area of about 2,400 square miles. 

About Cahuilla Indian Reservations

There are today a total of nine Cahuilla bands, each with their own reservation.  These reservations are: Agua Caliente, Augustine, Cabazon, Cahuilla, Los Coyotes, Morongo, Ramona, Santa Rosa, and Torres-Martinez.

About the Agua Caliente Indian Reservation

The Agua Caliente Indian Reservation derives its name from the hot spring in downtown Palm Springs.  The reservation compromises a little over forty-nine sections of land, or approximately 32,000 acres in three townships.  The reservation was set aside for the use and occupancy of the Agua Caliente people during the administrations of President Grant in 1876 and President Hayes in 1877.  It is not a contiguous reservation but a checkerboard of alternate (even numbered) sections in and around the cities of Palm Springs, Cathedral City, Rancho Mirage, and unincorporated Riverside County.